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Jetrea

ThromboGenics NV

Drug Names(s): Recombinant microplasmin, ocriplasmin, A01016, A-01016, THR-409

Description: Microplasmin is a truncated and stable form of plasmin, a naturally occurring enzyme that dissolves many blood plasma proteins, most notably, fibrin clots. Similar protein formations are also seen linking the vitreous to the retina in the eye, so the drug could be used to treat adhesions, where the vitreous gel has an abnormally strong attachment to the retina.

Deal Structure: In its May 2013 Business Update, ThromboGenics stated Jetrea generated sales of $10.2 million since its US launch through the end of April. Per a company representative, monthly or Q1 sales from this period will not be disclosed but first semester sales will be covered in the company's next update.

ThromboGenics and NuVue
In March 2004, ThromboGenics and NuVue Technologies entered into a license and cooperation agreement for the development of plasmin-based products. ThromboGenics obtained an exclusive license for all current, pending andfuture intellectual property of NuVue Technologies. ThromboGenics has agreed to compensate NuVue Technologies once a licensing agreement has been concluded with a third party. ThromboGenics could pay between USD 500,000 and USD 1,000,000 plus between 20% and 25%of the licensing income resulting from a third party agreement. If ThromboGenics were to commercialize microplasmin without a partner, the terms of the deal can...See full deal structure in Biomedtracker

Partners: NuVue Technologies Novartis AG


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